Video Conference
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Video Conferencing Best Practices

Best Practices for Video Conferencing

Relevance to Business Activities:

  • security – administrative safeguards considerations:
    • participants of a meeting:
      • take steps to ensure that only invited participants are able to join the meeting:
        • there is a chance of uninvited people showing up on video conferences;
        • consider security features of the services used for the meetings as some features allow hosts to:
          • password-protect a meeting; and
          • limit access by providing unique ID numbers for each meeting or participant.
        • if the user hosts the recurring meeting, they are allowed to create new passwords or ID numbers for each meeting:
          • employers should include the use of this method in their policy as it is more secure than reusing old credentials.
    • limiting access:
      • hosts should take advantage of the options to:
        • lock the meeting once the expected participants have arrived, preventing others from joining; and
        • approve each participant trying to join in, for the greatest level of control:
          • hosts may also have the ability to remove individual users from the meeting.
  • video camera and microphone:
    • when someone joins a meeting their camera and microphone may be on by default – they:
    • must be aware that participants may be able to see and hear them as soon as they join a meeting; and
    • should turn off the camera or mute themselves if they do not want to share sound and/or audio:
    • they may be able to adjust their default setting to store these preferences.
  • recording of the meeting:
    • sometimes it is indicated on the screen that the meeting is being recorded:
    • however, other times the meeting is being recorded without an indicator:
    • users should refrain from sharing private and confidential information via video conferencing.
  • screen sharing:
    • when sharing screens, users must ensure that they do not have open what they do not wish to share, such as:
    • documents;
    • browser windows; or
    • other things on their screens that are not for sharing.
    • consider the options to:
        • turn off screen sharing; or
        • limit its use to the host.
  • unexpected video conference invitations:
    • do not open unexpected video conference invitations or click on links:
    • malicious actors:
      • are sending emails mimicking meeting invitations or other communications from conferencing services; and
      • may copy the logo and look of familiar names in the business to add authenticity.
      • some links may contain viruses or install malware on the user’s computer;
    • employers should tell all staff members and clients in advance that:
      • there is a teleconference planned for a certain time; and
      • they should expect an invitation with the host’s name.
      • if the service used for conferencing requires downloading an app or desktop application:
        • ensure that it is downloaded from the service’s website or a platform’s app store.
  • confidential information:
      • if confidentiality is crucial, video conferencing may not be the best option:
      • businesses should:
        • consider alternatives if particularly sensitive topics are going to be discussed;
        • evaluate whether an enterprise service would provide greater security, rather than free services available to the general public; and
        • ask about dedicated telehealth conferencing services that can include more safeguards to keep information private:
          • if a business is conferencing remotely with a health care provider
  • conferencing software:
      • update the video conferencing software:
        • many video conferencing companies are updating their software with patches and fixes; and
        • users should only accept updates directly from the service’s website.
  • employee training:
    • train employees on best practices for video conferencing:
      • employees may enable a video conferencing service that does not meet the company’s security standards.
  • vendor management considerations:
    • service provider:
      • before using a conferencing service, review key provisions in the service’s privacy policy to understand:
        • the information that the service provider will collect; and
        • if the service provider is:
          • using the information collected for the purposes outlined in its privacy policy; and
          • sharing the information with third parties.